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CCB enhancement

Posted by Michael Phillips 
CCB enhancement
May 21, 2021 08:13PM
Temps in the 80s, passing thunderstorms predicted over the next couple of days, apple trees in glorious full bloom... time for a Competitive Colonization Boost – CCB – no questions asked. It's been exactly one week since I made Spring2 (the holistic app @ pink) and practically every blossom out there has opened since then. Getting competitive microbes and flavonoids (via the seaweed and karanja oil) in the opened flower is the ticket to keeping fire blight bacteria at bay holistically. And now thanks to a tidbit passed along from the Pacific Northwest, I've added a mineralization piece to the CCB recipe used during the bloom period when conditions warrant.

Washington organic growers have been having good success on the preemptive fire blight front with vermicompost tea (30 gallons per acre) and SeaCrop (one gallon per acre). It's the latter I added to the CCB mix this morning throughout the orchard. SeaCrop is a concentrated solution of ocean minerals in ionic liquid form. I've used this previously as a trace mineral tonic (like AEA's MicroPak or Agri-Dynamic's Mikronite) and definitely in "bionutrient ferments" as part of the ongoing plant sap research well underway. It's feels right to include a nutritional component to the CCB as well at that one gallon per 100 per acre rate. I applied the enhanced CCB mix moderately to varieties just kicking into full bloom (like Sweet Sixteen) and ​more heavy-handedly to favored-pollinator varieties (like Duchess) which have been "bee-knighted" for several days already. The latter in hope that knocking off most petals might cause the bees to move onto other varieties... fat chance!

That's the latest direct from this tractor seat.

Lost Nation Orchard
Zone 4b in New Hampshire
Re: CCB enhancement
July 02, 2021 12:57AM
any observations since May 21 and your tweek of CCB?

Old 99 Farm and permaculture site
Dundas ON 5b
Re: CCB enhancement
July 02, 2021 03:35PM
No blossom blight to report in the full month following that CCB application. Which doesn't necessary tell us anything... but I certainly feel good about the microbe coverage and nutrient boost. That bloom time spray was followed by Spring3 on May 26 – call it average petal fall – when we had another extreme fire blight warning following a thunderstorm that evening. Despite the heat, it was easy to maintain coverage for the minimal wetting events we had during that time with twelve days between Spring2 and Spring3, accompanied by one CCB application in-between. Keep in mind there will be years where multiple CCBs may be necessary as this is so keyed to high temps and rain/humidity that give fire blight bacterium the opportunity to enter the tree vascular system by means of an open flower. I'm certainly going to continue use of SeaCrop as I did this year in at least the first of any CCB applications.

Lost Nation Orchard
Zone 4b in New Hampshire
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