Yarlington Mill
August 16, 2015 06:08PM
The apples on my Yarlington Mill are rotting on the tree spectacularly. Here are a couple of images of what this looks like:



And, a little more advanced:



Is this a case of generalised severe scab, causing the fruit to crack, followed by invasion of other organisms?
If so, I would have to say that it is simply impossible to grow Yarlington Mill in my maritime zone 5b climate. (And I am not convinced that any amount of sprays of sulphur, copper, or anything else would control this. ) I did apply all the holistic sprays, so the EMs should have competitively inhibited whatever is going on here.

Broomholm Orchard
Zone 5b in Nova Scotia
Re: Yarlington Mill
August 17, 2015 09:54AM
That is indeed spectacular rot, David. I see some scab (maybe to the fore of the first photo?) but not the type of cracking I associate with scab.

Stimulating immune response in any plant begins with good mineralization in the soil and mycorrhizal affiliation between roots and a diverse population of fungi and other plants. I'm deep into writing a mycorrhizal book now and it is astounding how much plant health depends on this connection. We add EM to holistic sprays as the biology component to enhance competitive colonization on the leaf surface ... but it does not stand alone as regards thwarting primary infection pathogens like scab. It's a package deal from the soil up.

Rots differ from primary infection fungi in that penetration of the waxy exudates on the fruit skin surface (cuticle) is where the action takes place, with timing being petal fall and beyond. The actual damage to fruit doesn't become apparent till midsummer on. Cuticle strength is all about calcium and silica. This is where the fermented teas come into play for me, noting that Ca and S foliar products can be purchased as well. I will soon have a nutritional analysis of both teas to share, with the recipes having been provided back in the January edition of Community Orchardist. Anyhow, since you are dealing with rot, let me ask: What did you do as regards calcium and silica fortification of the cuticle?

I have two Yarlington Mill trees on Bud.118 and another on interstem, all several years old now but not yet fruiting. Leaves look good as regards scab, but others will have to say if Yarlington Mill is a "classic rotter" ... Empire being one such problematic variety. The rot pictured here looks like black rot, which leads on to another discussion on frog eye leaf spot as an earlier symptom. I recall you had some hurricane-derived fire blight a year or two back: Dead twigs resulting from that would indeed have become black rot vectors.

Let's not necessarily put the kibosh to this classic cider apple yet.

Lost Nation Orchard
Zone 4b in New Hampshire
Re: Yarlington Mill
August 20, 2015 05:25AM
For my part, I've had YM fruiting in Quebec (zone 4) since 1999, and never saw any cracking, nor any rot. There has been very minor scab lesions on a few bad scab years, but I'd say negligible scab considering it's cider usage.
This without any spray whatsoever...
Might also be useful to say that on only one year I noted some minor winterkill - so the variety is quite hardy.
Only drawback, it is not quite as productive as I would like it to be...

Jolicoeur Orchard
Zone 4 in Quebec
Re: Yarlington Mill
August 15, 2016 09:00PM
David,
This is my first post ever, and I absolutely wanted to know what happened to your YM. I have to say that I see exactly the same thing with my YM. I have a row on M26 that I planted in 2010. I got my first couple of apple 2 years ago. Didn't really pay attention then since I was not expecting any. I also thought as literature says that they were late apple. Anyhow, when I checked in September, they were rotten. I didn't make much of it then.
Last year, I had about 10ish, they look nice and all, but again they were rotting on the tree. I remembered one that looked OK and when I went to pick it, the stem stayed on the tree, and the apple was like a cooked apple. This year, the trees (30 of them) were quite productive. This year I had to pick them on the first weekend of August as they started to drop and rot. The pips were dark brown so I figure they were ripped, so I picked them.
I am somewhat new at growing apples. I am a chemist, so more on the cider part of it. What I find strange is that they ripe so early. I have Kingston Black on one side and Porter's Perfection on the other side, and both are doing fine. I have a few Purple Heart Trees (red flesh) a few rows over and they are doing the same. The trees themselves are growing pretty nicely, so I don't know what is going on.

Like you I am zone 5b and I also applied the holistic sprays and nothing else. I have no scab so don't have to worry about that yet.

Please let me know how yours are doing.

Black Creek Cider
Hinchinbrooke, Qc Zone 5b
Re: Yarlington Mill
August 16, 2016 08:48AM
I hadn't looked until you prompted me. But on my two YM trees, which look otherwise healthy, ( 6-8" of new clean growth), there is only one single stunted, cracked apple, and a number of blackened aborted flowers:



(I am trying faithfully to follow the excellent instructions on how to post images, but it isn't working. However, it looks as though if you click on the little green line in the box above, saying "open image URL", it will actually open the picture. Michael(s), any idea what I am doing wrong)

So, no rotting fruit, because they never got as far as making fruit at all. (And other cultivars are fruiting fine). Might this be some virus disease?? If it were a fungus, I would expect to see at least some evidence on other cultivars.

Broomholm Orchard
Zone 5b in Nova Scotia
Re: Yarlington Mill
August 16, 2016 11:11AM
David Maxwell Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> (I am trying faithfully to follow the excellent
> instructions on how to post images, but it isn't
> working. However, it looks as though if you click
> on the little green line in the box above, saying
> "open image URL", it will actually open the
> picture. Michael(s), any idea what I am doing
> wrong)

David, this is because the URL you provide is that of a HTML page, not of the JPG image...
The actual image URL would be:
http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y513/groworganicapples/Yarlington%20mill%202016%20002_zpsmlad6k5d.jpg

And you then get:




This being said, I am really puzzled as to why you and Denis have problems with YM. For me, and for a great number of growers all over the world (including Canada), this variety appears to be one of the most adaptable and reliable of the well known European cider apples.

Claude

Jolicoeur Orchard
Zone 4 in Quebec
Re: Yarlington Mill
August 17, 2016 01:00PM
I don't know, I first thought it was a tagging error and these were not really YM. I am surprised that they ripe so fast. I have planted another row of YM from a different nursery but this time on G30 two years ago. I had one small apple this year that is still hard and attached to the tree. I should be able to report next year if there is a difference between both set of trees.
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