Seedlings
October 28, 2015 05:20PM
I have read about how all varieties of apples are propagated via grafts, and how a seedling is always its own individual snowflake. Yet I've read — I believe on this forum — that a good way to grow a healthy Kingston Black in a region where it usually is sickly, is to raise it from seed.

Which confuses me to no end.

Does this mean that *some* apples can be grown from seed and they will breed true because presumably their line has been through the seven generations of inbreeding it takes a plant to breed true?

Just wondering.

Shelah Horvitz
Weld, ME
Zone 4b
Re: Seedlings
October 29, 2015 10:39PM
Shelah Horvitz Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Yet I've read — I believe on this forum — that a good way to
> grow a healthy Kingston Black in a region where it
> usually is sickly, is to raise it from seed.
> Does this mean that *some* apples can be grown
> from seed and they will breed true

NO!!!
A Kingston Black seed will not give you a Kingston Black tree!
It will be as different from it's Kingston Black mother as you may be different from your parents.

However, this Kingston Black seedling could become a great cider apple, even better than its parent - it is possible. This is simply genetic odds.

This being said, I think it is a good idea to sow apple pips and evaluate what comes from them. However, one should not expect to obtain something identical to the parent.

Claude

Jolicoeur Orchard
Zone 4 in Quebec
Re: Seedlings
October 30, 2015 06:42AM
Now that makes sense. Thank you for clearing that up.

By the way. Because I want to practice making cider and my trees are not bearing yet and cider apples of known varieties are simply unavailable around here, I've been tasting the innumerable wild apples around my town in Maine and will be pressing from them. Some of the apples I've found have been fabulous — one tasted of ginger and clove, another of vanilla, another like an Anjou pear. Only one has been bittersweet (and it is mild, a porcupine favorite), but still, an American bittersweet! If the cider comes out well I will take cuttings, because the fact that these apples are thriving here in this harsh climate speaks of their hardiness.

Shelah Horvitz
Weld, ME
Zone 4b
Re: Seedlings
October 30, 2015 11:08AM
Shelah Horvitz Wrote:
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> Only one has been bittersweet (and it is
> mild, a porcupine favorite), but still, an
> American bittersweet!

There are a lot more American and Canadian wild sweet and bittersweet varieties than anyone may think!
I have also noticed porcupines prefer sweet apples, and also unfortunately the wood of these trees. It is like if the wood and bark from a sweet apple would taste better for them!

Yes, do evaluate these seedling trees. Choose those that are not too acidic when you take a bite otherwise you might end up with battery-acid cider...

Claude

Jolicoeur Orchard
Zone 4 in Quebec
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