Welcome! Log In Create A New Account

Advanced

healthy soil, healthy gut

Posted by Andy Brennan 
healthy soil, healthy gut
June 15, 2013 07:56AM
This article touches on much of our mycorrizal discussions in 'Understory Management' and relates it to intestinal ecosystems:
http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/06/healthy-soil-microbes-healthy-people/276710/]Atlantic: Healthy Microbes[/url]

Also, the NYTimes ran an article last week on "wild foods" and how they benefit humans infinitely more then their modern descendant varieties:
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/26/opinion/sunday/breeding-the-nutrition-out-of-our-food.html?smid=fb-share]Breeding Nutrition Out of Food[/url]. Unfortunately the Times article did not once mention soil conditions of "wild" foods but as the Atlantic article would suggest the interest in soil mycrobial health is hitting the mainstream by way of awakening the public to, and relating it to, our ability to extract health benefit from its fruits.

I'd just like to add that as a cider maker I relate this discussion to the microbial activity of fermentation and the long aging process. I should also mention that much of my apples are foraged from wild or abandoned trees. And though I haven't read the book, I'm sure Claude says something about the different fermentations of "farmed" vs "wild" apples. It is visibly different and the ultimate taste is WILDY different.

I'd love to hear more from logic-oriented minds. I tend to just follow my instincts which leads me astray often. My instincts on this tell me that Michael's forest-edge orchard thoughts are dead on, if not leaning too much toward sun exposure (the soil temperatures will undoubtedly be warmer from what the apple originated from.) But it's the long-term build up of a forest or forest-edge soil ecology that I think produces the fruit I'm looking for for cider. I just "trust" its healthier for me.

Andrew Brennan
Aaron Burr Cidery
-
Wurtsboro, NY
Lower Hudson Valley
Zone 5a



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 06/20/2013 10:09AM by Michael Phillips.
Re: Healthy soil, healthy gut
June 15, 2013 04:50PM
Hello Andy,
Didn't know you were here!
Quote
You wrote
And though I haven't read the book, I'm sure Claude says something about the different fermentations of "farmed" vs "wild" apples. It is visibly different and the ultimate taste is WILDY different.

I'm afraid I didn't go as far as discussing the influence of fungus in the soil... I do talk about cultural practices, but mostly in relation to fertilization and the influence of the nitrogenous substances that come from fertilization and end-up in the juice where they act as a yeast nutrient, hence on the speed of fermentation.

Another important difference between "farmed" vs "wild" apples is in the size of the fruit and its concentration of sugar and flavor. Often smaller fruit has less water, hence everything else is more concentrated... However, I've seen wild untended seedlings here (one on my property and one on the other side of the road) that produce huge apples (over 3-1/2 in)! What would it be if those varieties were put over a dwarf rootstock and given doses of nutrients?

Claude

Jolicoeur Orchard
Zone 4 in Quebec
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login